For over three decades, we have been floating eight miles down the Potomac River from Dam No. 3 above Harpers Ferry, West Virginia to Brunswick, Maryland. Unlike a typical guided bass-boat fishing trip, the stretch of river we run varies from Class III whitewater to deep pools and is loaded with ledges and islands. In many places the river is over a quarter mile across. This is prime smallmouth bass water.

Float trips include:

20" 4.5 lb smallmouth Bass!

20" 4.5 lb smallmouth Bass!

  • A full day of instruction and fishing. Starting time is 8:00 a.m. We’re usually off the water by dusk.
  • A selection of flies and lures along with outfitted rods are available for the fly or spin angler's use.
  • Information on reading water and locating fish.
  • Coverage of casting techniques and methods of fishing a variety of streamers, fly patterns or lures while floating or wading.
  • History, geology, and river lore.
  • Lunch, snacks, and beverages - Most clients say we put on the best "river feast" they’ve ever had.

The Potomac float trip fee is $500 per boat, with two anglers to a boat. Larger parties can be accommodated by running multiple boats. Contact us to book a trip!

What to expect:
In order to run a one-of-a-kind trip, we designed some one-of-a-kind boats: 14 to 16 foot inflatable whitewater rafts equipped with custom-made aluminum frames. Swivel bucket seats, chain drag and anchoring systems, fishing rod storage racks, coolers stocked with food and drinks, and other special features increase comfort and ease of fishing.

We launch slightly north of Dam 3. From the put-in to the dam the river is slow-moving, flat, and deep. Largemouth bass and walleye often lurk in the calmer water. Below the dam lies the Upper Needles, a long section of small rapids, riffles, and grass. Fish like to hide in the stillwater behind rocks in this area, grabbing food (and lures!) floating down in the current. Downstream from the rapids is the Catfish Hole, a deep section of the river where the locals like to fish for our whiskered friend. Lefty's Hole harbors good-sized smallmouth, especially in the spring. Butch minnows and other meal-sized streamers produce the best results. The river continues into the Lower Needles, a second stretch of rapids providing more opportunities for structure fishing.

MKFS floating through the lower needles

The Potomac and Shenandoah confluence, looking back towards harpers ferry

Whitehorse rapids

Below the Needles lies an area of flatwater as the river flows under two railroad bridges and passes Harpers Ferry at the confluence with the Shenandoah. Take time to look up at Maryland Heights as it towers over Harpers Ferry. In October 1859, John Brown crossed the river and raided the federal arsenal in the city. For the next six years, the confluence witnessed the bloody Civil War. Fortunately, the river is more peaceful now and the confluence offers a chance to tag a fish of great character. Over 9,000 square miles of drainage carries forage through the well-established lies in this famous Blue Ridge gap.  Below the confluence, the river passes through two sets of rapids which provide the kicks on the trip. Mad Dog's bark is worse than its bite, but when you get to Whitehorse it's time to put the fishing rods down and hold on to your seat through this Class III whitewater area. When George Washington first came upon Whitehorse, he feared it was enough to halt commerce to the West. She may be called Whitehorse, but if you're not careful, she can kick like a rented mule.

Most other river enthusiasts exit at Potomac Wayside just above the U.S. 340 bridge, leaving MKFS rafts to run the second half of the trip undisturbed. The river is shallow, wide, and slow for about two miles downstream from the bridge, with a few riffles coming from a ledge or two. At the foot of Short Hill and South Mountains lie the Weverton, Old Mill, and Knoxville Falls rapids. About the only thing to accompany us through this stretch is a pair of nesting bald eagles that swoop down for a quick meal.

Dropping through Knoxville Falls, the river passes a few small islands before opening up and becoming lake-like. The "Brunswick Lake" portion of the river is dotted with a grouping of ledges and very small islands about half way to the Maryland Route 17 boat ramp. The casting targets in this area are more subtle, but the fishing can hold up well. This is an excellent time to pick the fly rod back up as any wind usually dissipates late in the afternoon making hair poppers particularly effective.

A detailed map of the section of river we run is available here.
Read more in our Guides and FAQ sections.

Knoxville falls

brunswick at dusk